Why you don’t need a task killer app with Android.

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A lot of people have asked us what the best app is for killing tasks? Well, the answer is none of them. Sure there are some nice apps out there for killing tasks, but the fact is you just don’t need one with Android. In fact, most developers won’t even look at your logcat file if they see you running a task killer app on your Android-based phone.

To clear things up about this, Google’s Android developers blog has finally put this debate to rest about why a task killer is unnecessary, as well as why there are certain services that run in the background all the time, I’m sure at one time or another you’ve seen them and asked yourself “Why do those services keep starting after I kill them?”. Below you can read about when applications stop. If you want to learn more about this topic to can read the full post by clicking here.

When does an application “stop”?

A common misunderstanding about Android multitasking is the difference between a process and an application. In Android these are not tightly coupled entities: applications may seem present to the user without an actual process currently running the app; multiple applications may share processes, or one application may make use of multiple processes depending on its needs; the process(es) of an application may be kept around by Android even when that application is not actively doing something.

The fact that you can see an application’s process “running” does not mean the application is running or doing anything. It may simply be there because Android needed it at some point, and has decided that it would be best to keep it around in case it needs it again. Likewise, you may leave an application for a little bit and return to it from where you left off, and during that time Android may have needed to get rid of the process for other things.

A key to how Android handles applications in this way is that processes don’t shut down cleanly. When the user leaves an application, its process is kept around in the background, allowing it to continue working (for example downloading web pages) if needed, and come immediately to the foreground if the user returns to it. If a device never runs out of memory, then Android will keep all of these processes around, truly leaving all applications “running” all of the time.

Of course, there is a limited amount of memory, and to accommodate this Android must decide when to get rid of processes that are not needed. This leads to Android’s process lifecycle, the rules it uses to decide how important each process is and thus the next one that should be dropped. These rules are based on both how important a process is for the user’s current experience, as well as how long it has been since the process was last needed by the user.

Once Android determines that it needs to remove a process, it does this brutally, simply force-killing it. The kernel can then immediately reclaim all resources needed by the process, without relying on that application being well written and responsive to a polite request to exit. Allowing the kernel to immediately reclaim application resources makes it a lot easier to avoid serious out of memory situations.

If a user later returns to an application that’s been killed, Android needs a way to re-launch it in the same state as it was last seen, to preserve the “all applications are running all of the time” experience. This is done by keeping track of the parts of the application the user is aware of (the Activities), and re-starting them with information about the last state they were seen in. This last state is generated each time the user leaves that part of the application, not when it is killed, so that the kernel can later freely kill it without depending on the application to respond correctly at that point.

In some ways, Android’s process management can be seen as a form of swap space: application processes represent a certain amount of in-use memory; when memory is low, some processes can be killed (swapped out); when those processes are needed again, they can be re-started from their last saved state (swapped in).

Source: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2010/04/multitasking-android-way.html

About the Author

Cody Banks
Technolust is what I'm all about! Ever since I got my G1 and Android came on the scene, I can't keep my mind away from what's new and cool things Android can give. Love gaming it up as well. Gears of war 2 is what you will see me playing most of the time. "Obey your Technolust"!

  • Penny

    Ok I’ll try this and I’ll monitor my battery life.

    • hkhv

      Bull $h#t all it does is dragoon my freaking battery.

  • Penny

    Ok I’ll try this and I’ll monitor my battery life.

  • http://www.joshourisman.com Josh

    The problem with this approach is that it doesn’t take into consideration the fact that there are other resources which an app running in the background might take up that are even higher priority than memory. Specifically: battery life. The only time I use a task killer is when my battery starts to get a bit low so I can kill off background tasks that take up processor cycles (and thus battery) without being memory hogs. Good examples are SportsTap and WeatherBug; MOST of the time I really like having those running in the background so I can always have up to date information on the current temperature or how the Mets are doing (in DC during the summer both are usually depressing, but at least I’ve got that information at my fingertips!), but when the battery gets low I want to kill those tasks as well as things like background Twitter checking because they aren’t essential. Typically this isn’t a problem as I usually have ~80% battery life remaining when I get home from work without having to plug my Nexus One in, but on days with atypical usage it can make a huge difference.

  • http://www.joshourisman.com Josh

    The problem with this approach is that it doesn’t take into consideration the fact that there are other resources which an app running in the background might take up that are even higher priority than memory. Specifically: battery life. The only time I use a task killer is when my battery starts to get a bit low so I can kill off background tasks that take up processor cycles (and thus battery) without being memory hogs. Good examples are SportsTap and WeatherBug; MOST of the time I really like having those running in the background so I can always have up to date information on the current temperature or how the Mets are doing (in DC during the summer both are usually depressing, but at least I’ve got that information at my fingertips!), but when the battery gets low I want to kill those tasks as well as things like background Twitter checking because they aren’t essential. Typically this isn’t a problem as I usually have ~80% battery life remaining when I get home from work without having to plug my Nexus One in, but on days with atypical usage it can make a huge difference.

  • Geert

    But killing tasks is still helpful for preserving battery, or not?

  • Geert

    But killing tasks is still helpful for preserving battery, or not?

  • UX-Guy

    The restoring the previous state doesn’t seem to work properly. Many apps completely restart when you come back to them unless you extend the memory using a swap partition, which is also said to be unnecessary on Android.

    • Anonymous

      Not if you use Task Manager by Adao. This “task killer” prevents apps from restarting if you don’t want them to — however — you must be using Froyo (2.2) or above.

  • UX-Guy

    The restoring the previous state doesn’t seem to work properly. Many apps completely restart when you come back to them unless you extend the memory using a swap partition, which is also said to be unnecessary on Android.

  • Tim

    This is very true and hopefully will stop people quite so brutally killing tasks. HOWEVER, there are still uses for task killers. I keep Advanced Task Manager around because I have a few apps which are not the best design and can stay ‘working’ as far as Android is concerned but what they present the user is useless. The example in mind is any of Storm8’s MMO games. They are basically a wrapper for web-fed data. If your connection drops mid page-load you can get errors and layout issues. The app itself is still behaving properly so if you go back to Home and then re-open, you still have the corrupt page. It can be useful to kill and then re-launch such apps with a task killer.
    Basically, they have their uses, but the auto-kill things are a waste of time.

  • Tim

    This is very true and hopefully will stop people quite so brutally killing tasks. HOWEVER, there are still uses for task killers. I keep Advanced Task Manager around because I have a few apps which are not the best design and can stay ‘working’ as far as Android is concerned but what they present the user is useless. The example in mind is any of Storm8’s MMO games. They are basically a wrapper for web-fed data. If your connection drops mid page-load you can get errors and layout issues. The app itself is still behaving properly so if you go back to Home and then re-open, you still have the corrupt page. It can be useful to kill and then re-launch such apps with a task killer.
    Basically, they have their uses, but the auto-kill things are a waste of time.

  • what

    If they were unnecessary Google wouldn’t have implemented a task killer in froyo 2.2

    And here is Google employees practically endorsing the use of TKs. Not all apps are perfectly written

    http://www.droid-life.com/2010/05/19/google-blame-poor-apps-for-poor-battery-life/

  • what

    If they were unnecessary Google wouldn’t have implemented a task killer in froyo 2.2

    And here is Google employees practically endorsing the use of TKs. Not all apps are perfectly written

    http://www.droid-life.com/2010/05/19/google-blame-poor-apps-for-poor-battery-life/

  • http://www.PeterSouza.com/ Peter Souza IV

    Yeah, this is a failpost. Task killers are beneficial for battery life, not for freeing memory. This post is intended to go address myths for one audience, not both.

    • Hazel

      Read and educate yourself:

      http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=678205

      Battery life and memory in the said case above would not be correlated. However, battery and CPU cycles ARE. Not all running apps are using up any CPU cycle at all unless it’s an app gone wrong in which case it would be better anyway to reboot.

  • http://www.PeterSouza.com/ Peter Souza IV

    Yeah, this is a failpost. Task killers are beneficial for battery life, not for freeing memory. This post is intended to go address myths for one audience, not both.

  • B

    If you know something is poorly written, why use it?

    Complain to the developer, and ask them to fix the problems. This is even easier in 2.2.

    As for battery life, thats how the phone works, If you want to save some battery life, start turning off sync, or just charge whenever possible.

    You can get a cheap 700mA usb car charger on ebay, and always charge in your car.
    Get a spare battery, its removable for a reason.

  • B

    If you know something is poorly written, why use it?

    Complain to the developer, and ask them to fix the problems. This is even easier in 2.2.

    As for battery life, thats how the phone works, If you want to save some battery life, start turning off sync, or just charge whenever possible.

    You can get a cheap 700mA usb car charger on ebay, and always charge in your car.
    Get a spare battery, its removable for a reason.

  • Gregory

    You can have my task killer when you pry it from my HTC Magic.

  • Gregory

    You can have my task killer when you pry it from my HTC Magic.

  • Rich

    B asked why use an app if you know that it is badly written.

    The answer is simple – it does something useful.

    Then why use a taskiller?

    The answer is simple – it does something unuseful.

    Hey – all things being equal I’ll pick the app that it is well-written. However, I don’t always get that choice. If Google gave me a way to block an app from launching services or whatever I’d do it. Since they don’t give me that ability I’ll use a task manager.

    I will say that I use task managers FAR less than I used to, just like I don’t go killing processes in windows all that often. However, these tools are useful when app writers just don’t get that we don’t all want every one of our apps syncing in the background all day, even if they can.

  • Rich

    B asked why use an app if you know that it is badly written.

    The answer is simple – it does something useful.

    Then why use a taskiller?

    The answer is simple – it does something unuseful.

    Hey – all things being equal I’ll pick the app that it is well-written. However, I don’t always get that choice. If Google gave me a way to block an app from launching services or whatever I’d do it. Since they don’t give me that ability I’ll use a task manager.

    I will say that I use task managers FAR less than I used to, just like I don’t go killing processes in windows all that often. However, these tools are useful when app writers just don’t get that we don’t all want every one of our apps syncing in the background all day, even if they can.

  • Jack Dub

    yeah, after reading another article like this, i stopped using my task-killer …. until my favorite browser (a popular one) gave me a ‘can’t open page, too many tabs open’ .. ok fine .. i went to close some tabs and i got a ‘must Forclose error’ and i got kicked to my home screen .. ok fine .. i went to re-open my browser and it was right where it left off .. all the tabs were still open and it would Forclose when i went to close a tab ..

    i’m not going to reboot my phone everytime my browsers fill up with tabs, waiting for a browser update that fixes that on my phone, so a simple Kill All, i’m back in business.

    when they stop doing android updates and everyone writes perfect code that works perfectly on every flavour of phone, then maybe i won’t need task kill, but that won’t happen :D

    • Hazel

      I guess that’s the reason for the fast boot up in the Desire HD and the Desire Z. I don’t know if it comes with all Android 2.2 Froyo booted phones but it should because it’s better for the phone than closing an app via a task killer.

  • Jack Dub

    yeah, after reading another article like this, i stopped using my task-killer …. until my favorite browser (a popular one) gave me a ‘can’t open page, too many tabs open’ .. ok fine .. i went to close some tabs and i got a ‘must Forclose error’ and i got kicked to my home screen .. ok fine .. i went to re-open my browser and it was right where it left off .. all the tabs were still open and it would Forclose when i went to close a tab ..

    i’m not going to reboot my phone everytime my browsers fill up with tabs, waiting for a browser update that fixes that on my phone, so a simple Kill All, i’m back in business.

    when they stop doing android updates and everyone writes perfect code that works perfectly on every flavour of phone, then maybe i won’t need task kill, but that won’t happen :D

  • Obry

    Sorry but I simply don’t agree with this article. Maybe that’s true for stock Android install with zero third party apps (and no Google apps either such as Voice). I use TaskPanel X (love the 1×1 widget) and regardless of what this articles says, pressing that little “Kill All” button speeds up my phone instantly especially after using a number of different apps. I have the most important ones excluded (and it doesn’t kill background services such as GoogleVoiceSync, Android Keyboard, etc). I’m running CM6 on my MT3G and without a task killer the phone would come down to a crawl eventually running out of memory and only after then the would this low memory task killer kick in. Maybe things are different on a Nexus One or other similarly powerful device with fast processor and lots of free RAM but on my trusty old MyTouch 3G with only 50 or so free ram and 528Mhz CPU things are not quite as described in this article. And also where do T-Mobile and other carriers get the idea to recommend Task Killers to their customers? Maybe because that’s the only actual way to speed up your slow phone.

    • rubaDubDub

      I agree

  • Obry

    Sorry but I simply don’t agree with this article. Maybe that’s true for stock Android install with zero third party apps (and no Google apps either such as Voice). I use TaskPanel X (love the 1×1 widget) and regardless of what this articles says, pressing that little “Kill All” button speeds up my phone instantly especially after using a number of different apps. I have the most important ones excluded (and it doesn’t kill background services such as GoogleVoiceSync, Android Keyboard, etc). I’m running CM6 on my MT3G and without a task killer the phone would come down to a crawl eventually running out of memory and only after then the would this low memory task killer kick in. Maybe things are different on a Nexus One or other similarly powerful device with fast processor and lots of free RAM but on my trusty old MyTouch 3G with only 50 or so free ram and 528Mhz CPU things are not quite as described in this article. And also where do T-Mobile and other carriers get the idea to recommend Task Killers to their customers? Maybe because that’s the only actual way to speed up your slow phone.

    • rubaDubDub

      I agree

  • Somebody

    Damned ignorance.

    1) Killing a task does NOT SAVE BATTERY. It WASTES BATTERY. If a process isn’t doing ANYTHING, then it isn’t using ANY BATTERY AT ALL. The ACT of killing it consumes CPU cycles, which means BATTERY.

    2) Applications that don’t restore properly are badly written applications. This is not a fault of ANDROID.

    3) The “task killer” in froyo is nothing new. Its been there for a while, and in fact, has been part of UNIX since the beginning of time. The usefulness of the integrated task killer is related to forcing THAT application’s current state to die so that THAT application can be reloaded from fresh. This is an alternative to starting up a whole bunch of other applications just to force that one to get reclaimed.

    And of course, the really really big ugly problem with task killers:
    SOME PROCESSES WANT TO RUN, and when you KILL them, they will just start right back up. So now you have an automatic task killer continually killing some process that keeps respawning forever. This will REALLY kill your battery FAST.

    @Jack dub: you’re missing the point of this discussion. It has nothing to do with killing off misbehaving applications, which is a good thing (and is actually built into android). It has to do with using task killers (especially AUTOMATIC task killers) to save memory or battery. A task killer is NOT going to save memory or battery.

    • Hazel

      I love you. You said all I needed to say to all the people out there living in the darkness of their own ignorance.

      To all: WHAT HE/SHE SAID. =P

    • Hazel

      And oh… It also seems like people have gotten used to the Windows concept that the less memory used, the better the performance. PEOPLE THIS IS NOT THE CASE IN LINUX AND ANDROID IS BASED ON A MODIFIED KERNEL OF LINUX. LINUX! NOT Windows!

    • 2twangy

      Cannot agree with you on point 2. Badly written apps are the faults of Android. To be more exact, Google sucks in assuring the quality of apps put on App Market. Look at AppStore of iPhone, Apple upholds the rule that an app must fully release resources when it is closed. Failing to comply with this simple rule, an app would not appear in AppStore.

  • Somebody

    Damned ignorance.

    1) Killing a task does NOT SAVE BATTERY. It WASTES BATTERY. If a process isn’t doing ANYTHING, then it isn’t using ANY BATTERY AT ALL. The ACT of killing it consumes CPU cycles, which means BATTERY.

    2) Applications that don’t restore properly are badly written applications. This is not a fault of ANDROID.

    3) The “task killer” in froyo is nothing new. Its been there for a while, and in fact, has been part of UNIX since the beginning of time. The usefulness of the integrated task killer is related to forcing THAT application’s current state to die so that THAT application can be reloaded from fresh. This is an alternative to starting up a whole bunch of other applications just to force that one to get reclaimed.

    And of course, the really really big ugly problem with task killers:
    SOME PROCESSES WANT TO RUN, and when you KILL them, they will just start right back up. So now you have an automatic task killer continually killing some process that keeps respawning forever. This will REALLY kill your battery FAST.

    @Jack dub: you’re missing the point of this discussion. It has nothing to do with killing off misbehaving applications, which is a good thing (and is actually built into android). It has to do with using task killers (especially AUTOMATIC task killers) to save memory or battery. A task killer is NOT going to save memory or battery.

  • Somebody

    @Obry:
    CM6…. you from the future or what?
    As for tmobile recommending something… do you realize that the tmobile tech support is just a room full of 15 year old kids? Tmobile tech support DOES NOT know how Android works. They are NOT qualified to give you any kind of instruction on it.

    And FYI: CM HIMSELF has said on MANY occasions that you MUST NOT use task killers. Reason is that they break everything. They make it slow, they eat battery. They are just plain BAD.

  • Somebody

    @Obry:
    CM6…. you from the future or what?
    As for tmobile recommending something… do you realize that the tmobile tech support is just a room full of 15 year old kids? Tmobile tech support DOES NOT know how Android works. They are NOT qualified to give you any kind of instruction on it.

    And FYI: CM HIMSELF has said on MANY occasions that you MUST NOT use task killers. Reason is that they break everything. They make it slow, they eat battery. They are just plain BAD.

  • iRyanS

    I really think this is funny, when I called into Google about my battery life sucking they asked if I had a task killer installed to help with the battery lilfe. They then transfered me to HTC and they also asked me if I had one installed as it helped with the battery life. So if they are such a bad thing why would google and HTC ask if I had one install to help with my abttery life?

  • iRyanS

    I really think this is funny, when I called into Google about my battery life sucking they asked if I had a task killer installed to help with the battery lilfe. They then transfered me to HTC and they also asked me if I had one installed as it helped with the battery life. So if they are such a bad thing why would google and HTC ask if I had one install to help with my abttery life?

  • Dustin

    All I know is this. If I leave Google maps running in the background my phone gets slow. If I kill it my phone speeds up. I have a g1

  • Dustin

    All I know is this. If I leave Google maps running in the background my phone gets slow. If I kill it my phone speeds up. I have a g1

  • Beer Meister

    Gack. Stop. Let those who want to run their task killers run them, for they know not what they do. Who cares? Kill your apps if that makes you feel better. Those of us who understand won’t run them. So run your little task killer if your Windows-only mindset makes you feel better about killing off tasks. And all of you task killer authors out there quit hating on these posts because you are losing advertising and application revenue.

  • Beer Meister

    Gack. Stop. Let those who want to run their task killers run them, for they know not what they do. Who cares? Kill your apps if that makes you feel better. Those of us who understand won’t run them. So run your little task killer if your Windows-only mindset makes you feel better about killing off tasks. And all of you task killer authors out there quit hating on these posts because you are losing advertising and application revenue.

  • jovianmexi

    Blah Blah Blah ….. Give me all your technical Jargon (btw im a Tech)…lmao…But I have a G1 and I noticed
    a considerable difference in battery life the moment I started using Advanced Task Killer.
    You may say its all in my head and that it doesnt make a difference but It wont stop me from using it lmao
    So go off on us and give us all the crap you want but as long as it works for me …Im happy :)

  • jovianmexi

    Blah Blah Blah ….. Give me all your technical Jargon (btw im a Tech)…lmao…But I have a G1 and I noticed
    a considerable difference in battery life the moment I started using Advanced Task Killer.
    You may say its all in my head and that it doesnt make a difference but It wont stop me from using it lmao
    So go off on us and give us all the crap you want but as long as it works for me …Im happy :)

  • TheSombreroKid

    This is exactly the same way every other operating system on the planet works, expcept when a desktop os runs out of memory it caches the memory used by the app it doesn’t demand the apications programmer do it’s memory management job for it, guess what even with this functionality and a decreased need to free up memory desktop os’s still let the user decide if an applications job is done or not.

    Google are a bunch of web and java programmers who think they can write an os, every decision they’ve made except basing it on linux is the exact oposite of what should be done, primarily there is no place on slow memory restriced devices for interpreted languages and secondly automatic memory management should be used to suppliment the manual management not subvert it.

  • TheSombreroKid

    This is exactly the same way every other operating system on the planet works, expcept when a desktop os runs out of memory it caches the memory used by the app it doesn’t demand the apications programmer do it’s memory management job for it, guess what even with this functionality and a decreased need to free up memory desktop os’s still let the user decide if an applications job is done or not.

    Google are a bunch of web and java programmers who think they can write an os, every decision they’ve made except basing it on linux is the exact oposite of what should be done, primarily there is no place on slow memory restriced devices for interpreted languages and secondly automatic memory management should be used to suppliment the manual management not subvert it.

  • jp2dj1

    I would say LIARS!!!! but strangely enough that I haven’t used task killer and don’t see any difference!! So case point taken I, in my opinion, believe it’s true. Further what logcat says logcat does!

  • jp2dj1

    I would say LIARS!!!! but strangely enough that I haven’t used task killer and don’t see any difference!! So case point taken I, in my opinion, believe it’s true. Further what logcat says logcat does!

  • Tommy

    I use a task killer for two thing, closing applications that are not functioning correctly. This happens from time to time. I also need it for closing applications like Fring, that don’t have an exit button and keeps logging in to my msn and skype account, making the MSN client on my computer log off all the time.
    Other than that I never ever use task killers.

  • Tommy

    I use a task killer for two thing, closing applications that are not functioning correctly. This happens from time to time. I also need it for closing applications like Fring, that don’t have an exit button and keeps logging in to my msn and skype account, making the MSN client on my computer log off all the time.
    Other than that I never ever use task killers.

  • Linuxluver

    I used to use task killers all the time. Then I began to understand how Android oversees tasks…and it became apparent the case for constant use of a task killer just wasn’t there. There was NO case for auto task killers at all. Android does that.

    But I have occasionally needed to kill a task I want to stop doing what it is doing…and that’s relatively rare. Maybe once a week – if that. Like if I have two media players fire up at the same time and try to play different songs. This sometimes happens when I push control buttons on my Bluetooth stereo headphones. Then I do start a task killer and kill one of the media players. But that behaviour seems to have stopped with Froyo, so maybe it was a bug that has been fixed.

    I do have a task Killer installed, but now I rarely use it. I absolutely do not wipe out all running tasks. That just isn’t necessary….and can be counter-productive.

    I used to be a mainframe systems programmer. The way Android handles processes makes a lot of sense to me. I don’t really improve on it by interfering.

  • Linuxluver

    I used to use task killers all the time. Then I began to understand how Android oversees tasks…and it became apparent the case for constant use of a task killer just wasn’t there. There was NO case for auto task killers at all. Android does that.

    But I have occasionally needed to kill a task I want to stop doing what it is doing…and that’s relatively rare. Maybe once a week – if that. Like if I have two media players fire up at the same time and try to play different songs. This sometimes happens when I push control buttons on my Bluetooth stereo headphones. Then I do start a task killer and kill one of the media players. But that behaviour seems to have stopped with Froyo, so maybe it was a bug that has been fixed.

    I do have a task Killer installed, but now I rarely use it. I absolutely do not wipe out all running tasks. That just isn’t necessary….and can be counter-productive.

    I used to be a mainframe systems programmer. The way Android handles processes makes a lot of sense to me. I don’t really improve on it by interfering.

  • Abhinav Asija

    Interesting article..

  • Abhinav Asija

    Interesting article..

  • Deriet

    @somebody: you’re funny.

    1: if a process isn’t doing anything USEFUL (e.g. keep trying to establish network connection while there isn’t a connection), than it will surely consume CPU cycles and thus, drain the battery. You must understand this.

    2: the fact that it is not Androids “fault”, doesn’t reduce the effectiveness of the solution. You understand that too. don’t you?

  • Deriet

    @somebody: you’re funny.

    1: if a process isn’t doing anything USEFUL (e.g. keep trying to establish network connection while there isn’t a connection), than it will surely consume CPU cycles and thus, drain the battery. You must understand this.

    2: the fact that it is not Androids “fault”, doesn’t reduce the effectiveness of the solution. You understand that too. don’t you?

  • just some dude

    It is a brilliant system of multitasking that no other Mobile OS can come close to reproducing, Android does not need apps killers or memory managers. Even the “new” iPhone OS4 does not have true multitasking, and in fact has copied some tricks from Android to help it come close to multitasking. Android is simply years ahead in multitasking.

    • WitchMX

      Have you come across the Palm Pre? . Now, thats real multitasking. Their “card” system is by far the best MT system in the market now. The Pre 2 was tested running up to 50 apps with no lag.

      I am an Android user BTW, but used to have a Pre, good phone but I love the customization of android.

  • just some dude

    It is a brilliant system of multitasking that no other Mobile OS can come close to reproducing, Android does not need apps killers or memory managers. Even the “new” iPhone OS4 does not have true multitasking, and in fact has copied some tricks from Android to help it come close to multitasking. Android is simply years ahead in multitasking.

  • Silas Hansen

    Yes, the battery is removable for the reason of changing it if its dead, not for changing it during the day because you run out of power. If it was, the phone should have some kind of backup powersource to keep it running, which it does not. Would simply be too much work to turn the phone on and off for that..

  • Silas Hansen

    Yes, the battery is removable for the reason of changing it if its dead, not for changing it during the day because you run out of power. If it was, the phone should have some kind of backup powersource to keep it running, which it does not. Would simply be too much work to turn the phone on and off for that..

  • skillz

    Skillzoneit helps with battery life because it stops apps from connecting to the internet or trying to. If you have an app that keeps trying to send and receive signals (on the wireless network) then tk’s should help (if they’re allowed to end them). They do seem to help for this purpose from ny experience.

  • skillz

    Skillzoneit helps with battery life because it stops apps from connecting to the internet or trying to. If you have an app that keeps trying to send and receive signals (on the wireless network) then tk’s should help (if they’re allowed to end them). They do seem to help for this purpose from ny experience.

  • lolobabes

    i am not needing it now with froyo but with 2.1 i think you may need it realistically speaking, ahihihihi

  • lolobabes

    i am not needing it now with froyo but with 2.1 i think you may need it realistically speaking, ahihihihi

  • Fatstogey

    But its accessable not just for my “needs.” Yea its not running but it keeps it around. At which time the phone could start using them without my permission. When i remove the process that particular app cant do anything i dont tell it to do.

    They tell you they dont. Yet why would they make it so you cant do it anymore? Because they want the apps running. They want communication, against your will. Sorry thats just not gonna cut it.

    Dont tell me “the processes dont need to be stopped.” Instead tell me why its so important that i not stop them?” Ok they dont interfere but why cant i stop them? i cant have control of this device i just paid hundreds for? Am i leasing it? No. I bought it. I want the control. And i dont care what google thinks cause theyre a multination multibillion dollar corporation. And i trust them as far as i can throw em. And not far cause google is pretty heavy.

    Dont tell me. Do what i want. Period. I dont want the apps running, as thousands of others dont. Make it happen. I dont care what some computer geek says. I dont wnat it there. Period.

  • Stephan

    This is not necessarily true. If the app programmer does not explicitly stop services, timertasks, callbacks etc before exiting they will continue to run in the background until the Android OS kills the process. From my limited experience the OS does not kill processes unless it’s coming up short on memory or after a long long time (at its discretion). Anytime before then you’re at the mercy of badly programmed apps – at least one reason why task killers stop lag.

    http://stephnet.us/geek/?p=83

  • motodr1

    I am a Regional Sales Manager for a battery and power supply company. We handle mobile/smart phone, laptop, up to industrial wet and sealed. Understand me as an expert when I say that Task Killer/Task Manger programs save battery life. Also understand that the vast majority of retail and upgrade phone transactions that take place with the wireless SERVICE PROVIDERS are due to the consumer belief that a phone is “faulty”, or they don’t see the purpose of buying a new battery for $50 when they can “upgrade” and get a new phone for about the same price. In fact, roughly 71% of new wireless/smart phone sales can be contributed to poor battery performance.
    Also understand that lithium chemistry batteries (lithium-ion, lithium polymer(li-po), etc.) are designed to last an average of 1.75 to 2.5 years or between 300-1000 cycles (larger components may see 1200 cycles). If cycled (charging cycles) properly, they may last between 3-4 years, but it’s rare. If we cycle the battery daily, longevity of the battery is decreased dramatically. Most lithium-ion batteries in phones are designed to be cycled a few hundred times, and if we must cycle daily, we’re lucky to get a year of quality run-time.
    I love Capitalism, but you don’t need to harm the consumer in the process. Prior to the “froyo”/2.2 upgrade I was getting between 2 and 3 days of run-time. Since the very day of my upgrade, and the programmers rendering the task-killers useless, my run-time is less than a day. I restored the phone, have literally 1 downloaded application (Google Maps – love and need), re-established the corporate e-mails, turn on wireless ONLY when necessary (15 mins/day max), and there is no improvement in run-time. Battery life and device life, due to processors and components constantly running go hand in hand. In the end, here comes an influx of people upgrading and getting rid of what could’ve been a long lasting, quality phone.

    Here’s my question Google… How much did you sell your soul to the manufacturers and service providers for? You had a great, innovative, desirable product and killed the quality… Now it’s garbage.

    P.S.- Why ditch the Corporate Calender? I have 20-30 appointments weekly for business. I put 15-20 family appointments weekly as well. My calendar is a jumbled mess. I had to clear the personal caledar…not cool!

  • frank

    Motodr, you are incorrect. They do not save battery life. You are a sales manager, whereas the original article was written by a software engineer. Understand that you’re not the expert you think you are. Confirmation bias and the observer effect I’m afraid.

    • Abc

      nigga shut up wit ur big words and just let the dude enjoy his damn phone. thinkin u important and whatnot, nigga u gay

    • jason

      You are retarted

  • Bri

    Im no tech guy but I’ve spent 1day using a task killer and the next day not. Same call and text frequency. The day I used the task killer my phones battery lasted longer and seamed to run faster. Why? -Droid X 2.2

  • Bri

    Im no tech guy but I’ve spent 1day using a task killer and the next day not. Same call and text frequency. The day I used the task killer my phones battery lasted longer and seamed to run faster. Why? -Droid X 2.2

  • Brangeleno

    If given a choice I prefer the option to end a process myself, especially if it will help me avoid a reboot.

    One good example of why task killing is useful and better managed by the user:

    Google Maps detected a low memory situation and *disabled* traffic without additional options (or permission).

    The ability to kill processes has given tech-savvy users an easy way to bypass an unresponsive Exit button for years and in EVERY OS, why take it away?

    The google maps example above is the opposite behaviour I want out of my device, so in a way I’m saddened by the changes introduced by Froyo.

    There must be a root-ATK out there that actually works: anyone?

  • samsung acclaim

    All I know is I’ve been uninstalling my taskkiller and installing. Wen I have my task killer installed it works fine but I get som stupid stuff dat my fone is freezing and I hav to restart it but its not been goin on for a little bit so its koo, I hav my taskkiller uninstalled amd evryting is laggy and I’m probb gona install it again

  • Jnjsnh

    GO PALM SWIPE AND
    DONE

  • Jnjsnh

    GO PALM SWIPE AND
    DONE

  • Crapaccountadvert

    To the author of the article: maybe, but he thing is many applications run in the background to “spy” on you, and consume internet bandwith and data.

    • https://www.google.com/accounts/o8/id?id=AItOawnhd7SSldd2MM4hcs1egH6JchFWsDAqXzk Lie

      If you know a crappy program spies on you, why are you installing it in the first place?

      • toys

        The crappy program that spies on me, footprints, came installed on my phone, and cannot be turned off.  If I try, it immediately starts itself back up.  I am told, oh it uses no resources, don’t worry, the information isn’t sent anywhere, trust us.  Bullshit, if its harmless let me get rid of it. 

  • Castle

    I could really care less what is causing the drain. If it’s poorly programmed applications, then it’s a quality control issue. Whatever the case may be, I do know this for a fact, Without the control of a task manager my battery life is pathetic at best with the mountain of garbage that constantly loiters in the background. Having run my Vibrant for days with and without the task manager of my choice, the result was flat out obvious. My battery life was better with it than without. Not amazingly better but better none the less. The only catch is knowing which tasks are hogs with no reason to incessantly loiter and which ones need to stay loaded to preserve functionality. Do the homework and a task manager can do exactly what it’s intended to do. So, plug your ears and stomp you feet while screaming “task killers are worthless” but, my battery still disagrees with you.

    • Mark

      I agree, android may not care how many tasks are running, but the battery certainly does…

    • Tyman

      Hey I’m not very tech just got my evo, don’t have to many aps yet other than the ones that came with it. My question is cant you just use the “force stop” function in your running aps settings rather than have to even use an ap like task killer?
      Doesn’t this perform the same function as task killer?

    • Mbuel76

      Look above, the guy who uninstalled a task manager killer and got better battery life. Clearly its not what the task killer is doing it u
      Is what it is killing. Like I stated above before I even touched a task killer I would use the built in tools plus watchdog, to check your battery useage and cpu useage. The amount of ram free does not matter. The cpu and radios and your screen are by far the biggest drain on power.

  • Cainn Mickey

    Nice to know that now…

    • Anthonyplanadeball

      I’m trying to get my to only wen i needed what U tnk plce. Fill free to advice. Tnk U.

  • selfdied

    I really like this article, I find this to be true with my vibrant, it runs much better without a task killer..for anyone who has a vibrant that disagrees, its not android it is samsungs crappy programming get oclf and change the minfree to strict and you’ll never use another task killer (Samsung broke androids built in task killed somehow btw)

    • Mbuel76

      Does oclf require root?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Pieter-Guijt/100000739300395 Pieter Guijt

    well wel my experience withe mi htc desire on android 2.2 i use Watchdog Task Manager the Watchdog program you can see your CPU programs that use lot CPU wen not in use i kill them i have Advanced Task Killer that lets my go to adroid force close thats how i get my battery running longer on adroid wen close in task manager not all ways close it

    program: Advanced Task Killer : use hold program Lang time ten pop ui and then force stop/detail
    program: Watchdog : use check CPU wen CPU program haay it alert you

  • Ajones7456

    What you don’t understand is that even if Android doesn’t think it needs to stop a process, it still drains the battery more as long as its running or more start running. ATK helps in stopping these processes to conserve battery life. People don’t use it to make their phone faster or to make more memory available for running apps, its to stop these processes from building up and draining battery life. This is vital to users of battery hogs like the Evo, Epic, Droid, and other devices of the like. You are right in that Android devices don’t need ATKs for making room for more apps to run, but you miss the point that it is for battery conservation as well…

  • Dsinghrana

    background service blocker in android is needed.if services are starting by itself then i will say its a big loop hole of android which developer are not able to fill. background service blocker in android is needed as they drain most of the battery. I look at it as BIG fail’r of developers over SMALL success of android.

  • Boombear

    Lets see….. Task Manager (only the one from Rhythm Software really works, ignore the others) seems to be increasing my battery life on NORMAL usage. Used to get like 15 hours (thats with wifi off 75% of the time, no 3g/4g on for testing purposes) to having wifi on all the time, and now I’m getting at least 24 hours of battery life….. 9 hour increase? seems to me like the task manager IS increasing battery life.

    I know some of you don’t use the Stocks app, Footprints, Peep, or for some of you, Sprint Navigation (which oddly won’t stay off even with no 3g/4g or wifi connection) and its nice to keep those apps off at all times if they’re not used. There’s even this crap-ass game called nova, which i have no idea why it needs to stay open when I haven’t used it since i got the phone. Task Managers CAN increase battery life. your excuses, such as its broken, are nothing more than inane retorts to just make sure you’re right. I’m sorry, but if a process didn’t consume battery life while not being used at that moment, you sir would be defying physics. Please gtfo and let people get a better battery life on their phones. you’re just mad bro.

  • Wyldstallynzdude

    ATKs are mainly used for conserving battery life, so ignore all this raucous about memory management. God, this article is so typical of programmers getting caught up in the tech and not looking at it from the user’s perspective.

    You know what Google should consider? Forcing devs to implement a “would you like to keep this application running?” prompt when they back out. Google needs to show a little more responsibility with quality control, instead of just creating an OS and letting devs run hogwild.

  • punkrock

    Atk gives way better battery life IMO. I hate seeing a heap of processes running that don’t need to be even after a reboot. Got a feeling development don’t like it is because ads could be loaded with the processes without Aitken.

    • Mbuel76

      They arent running. Get an app like watchdog lite. If a task killer helps, its because you have a bad app installed.

      You can also get those stats from your battery info panel.

  • Guest

    This blog is incorrect. My phone (Android) loads up tons of things which both use CPU cycles AND background bandwidth, that I don’t want running most of the time. Advanced Task Killer keeps them off.

  • Kiki

    I use TaskKiller free for more than 6 month on two phone and my battery life improved considerably (more than twice i would say) :
    https://market.android.com/details?id=net.androgames.taskkiller.ad

  • Im_begining_to_hate_htc

    ATK does not work, i kill the apps, but then in my notification bar they just re-appear!

  • skye

    Did you guys even read this? If you did you must not understand it. Pfff

  • Anonymous

    I am using Samsung Galaxy S android 2.2. When I first get it, I though it will save battery life and kill it. However when I read some of the post saying it suck up battery, I try uninstalling it. It helps to save my battery. That is what I think

    • Mbuel76

      Use the built in tools to save battery life. The power widget, and the battery useage chart. If your galaxy s is anything like mine the screen sucks 88% of power even on lowest brightness.

  • Sand

    Using MM2 with 2.2… had been having some issues… unistalled ATK, and they’re all gone… i’m not sure about battery life since i uninstalled it yesterdays… but the phone is running better than ever, smooth, no strange things… in fact, in 2.2 ATK was not able to kill some processes…. so there’s some truth to this… skype and the ex-msntalk app, where immortal… only i could kill them using Android’s resources, not ATK… again, i don’t know aobut battery life…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6LF57CVFKBJF2ILIFFXRM54S7I Phydeux

    There’s a lot of programs that don’t quit when they should.  One prime example is Facebook.  I might use it to upload a quick snapshot, back out of it, and once the upload is finished I’d expect it to close down.  WRONG!

    I’ve had Facebook devour my entire battery in under two hours because it just keeps going.  What its doing I couldn’t guess.  I have it configured not to auto-update.

    I’m sorry, but they really need to re-work how you close apps and actually have that CLOSE them.  Not to mention giving the user some say as to what starts up on its own.  I’ve never once used Footprints or Flikr, yet every time I turn around, both are running!   WHY???

    • Mbuel76

      If the official face book app is as poorly written as the official twitter app, im not surprised. I know on my buddies iPhone, the official facebook app causes all kinds of problems occasionally forcing a power off. My suggestion is to try a third party app.

  • Robert

    What about multiple instances of the same app? My task killer will sometimes shows that several identical tasks are running. Why doesn’t android kill, and not restart identical tasks by default?

  • Seventh Reign

    Whoever wrote this blog has obviously never actually used an Android device.

    • Luka Dornhecker

      And whoever wrote your comment obviously didn’t understand the post.

      • Moose

        All the articles on why you don’t need to kill apps always just talk about memory. Well memory isn’t the problem. Its battery usage.

        I have winamp as my media player, and its awesome. But it doesn’t quite when I close it. I noticed it uses up a fair amount of battery when its not playing music but running in the background so I have to remember to force quit it when I’m not playing music.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_5FXNIDM2CZEGBOIB3JROTF356M Mr.K

    To the writer, that’s complete bull the developers for Android needs to find away to end this bull crap with Android running unnecessary apps in the background. When you end a game that should be it just like a lot of apps that we install, the only apps that need to stay open are the ones that make the phone run give time show wallpaper and widgets. Any other apps should not have to stay running for anything. The reason why we close an app is to end the session of it’s use, so in no way or form should anything need to pull info from that app. I’m getting tired of having to use a task killer to end these app to free up processing on my device. Android developers needs to stop assuming what people want and actually start listen to the consumers.

  • Shnabz

    one word…..battery

  • gtropodi

    I would like to see Google tighten up on quality. Start a certification program or increase stipulations on existing certification. Of course these applications don’t “need” to be closed… but they don’t “need” to be running either, so why should they…money, advertisement, laziness? I agreed with the masses all Alps should simply have an exit and terminate option.

  • Clay

    The point is not that running apps drains batery – it’s simply that we are not given a choice, if we were we’d prevent inactive apps from running.

    Task killers are useless – even on rooted phones. If apps are programmed to run (like maps and power amp) they WILL run. And startup managers are the same – they don’t prevent certain apps from starting.

  • vp

    I like how all these writers parrot that you absolutely shouldn’t use task killers,
    When even motorolas xoom tips and tricks

    https://motorola-global-portal.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/63800/p_country_code/US

    Suggest they be used. Read it and weep.

  • Josean

    Before installing a task killer in my android 2.2 device it was always freezing and crashing, plus after using a tas killer I noticed great battery life improvements.

    At least my phone does need a task killer to work the way it should.

    Thanks for the information anyway.

  • Zeruch33

    My LG G2x runs much faster after installing an app killer. My battery life has been extended significantly also.

  • Douglas Lima

    WHAT A SUPA DUPA ULTRA MEGA BIG MASTER FUCKING BULLLLLLLSHIIIIIIIT!!!!!!!!!!

    My Motorola device simply gets fucking lazy and crazy, does not attend my commands, turns off the screen touching, turn off button, basic and advanced functions… It kills itself!!!!! Turns off by itself. tsc tsc tsc.

    Ridiculous… I would never use my cellphone right if I dont get rid of all the fucking processes or tasks or whatever you may want to call…
    Do install taks managers on your phone!

  • http://www.jocuripro.info/Jocuri-Educative Jocuri Educative

    Hey there, many thanks for revealing your thinking in Why you don’t need a task killer app with Android. | AndroidSPIN. This is really a cool website.

  • The Heckler

    What I haven’t heard is one cogent argument against the claim that some make that the applications are recording data on the user while they are “running” in the background. Is everyone really perfectly okay with corporations constantly running just in case we need them?

    I want to be in control of my product. I want to use the application, and then I want to shut it down and not be able to record what I am doing. If I want the application later, I am perfectly okay with restarting it even if I have to wait a couple of seconds, because at least then I know that I am in control of the products that I buy, where I go, and what I am doing.

  • http://www.angrysam.com Coldfusion Developer

    Can anyone point to an actual test-case scenario where “killing apps” vs not killing background apps has a measurable effect on battery life? I couldn’t find any actual test data.

  • http://www.travelblog.org/Europe/Andorra/Arinsal/blog-738331.html how to deal with social anxiety

    It’s very trouble-free to find out any topic on net as compared to textbooks, as I found this post at this web page.

  • kotezfan

    I wrote a game for Android.
    This is a game for cats. Cat to be caught moving the mouse.
    This is one of my first games.
    search “com.andrew.catgame”
    Thanks

  • Richie

    There are 100’s of blogs which say task killer for Android is not required but the fact is
    ” You Need It ”

    A simple example : install ‘ skype ‘ or ‘ we chat ‘ application when I am logged in and I press home button app keeps running in the background that is good. But even when I log out the app keeps running in the background. I will kill the task and again it will start running in the background. why should the app run when I am not logged in. It will of course have impact on my battery life, I can’t keep charging my phone every now and then and at the same time cannot uninstall skype for obvious reasons.

    so task killer app is a must have.

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