OK ladies and gentlemen, here it is, the device of the future.

I realize you’re all probably tired of hearing anything new about the Google Nexus S built by Samsung, so I’m not going to take up too much of your time.  I’ve been reading everything I can about the Google Nexus S and trying to work out in my brain…

What is Google Thinking?

When the Google Nexus One came out, it was the one and only device to get your hands on.  It had the external connectors for car and desktop docks, Aluminum casing and just looked and felt like the best Android phone ever released.  It’s still the best designed Android phone to date if you ask me.

Then comes the Google Nexus S, with the same old processor as current devices, in a plastic shell with no external connectors, no track ball or pad and the most ridiculous removal of any component ever.  Not to mention, no external upgradeable storage whatsoever.  I just don’t get it!

We better just hope that the GPS works when it arrives!

There are so many questions going around in my head; Why would Google release such a device? How can this mediocre device be launched as the flagship Android Gingerbread device?

So it has a curve to the screen! OMG, I think I’m going to wet my pants in excitement…. NOT

The hype has been abundant, been posted so many times on so many sites and you’ve all had a chance to absorb every detail about the Google Nexus S. What do you think?  Tell me why you’re going to purchase one, and why I should purchase one?  Tell me anything about this device that makes it any different from the existing line of Galaxy S phones available today.

Oh that’s right, I remember now, it has a Near Field Communications (NFC) capability we’ve all been eager to get our hands on.  That’s what makes it THE device to have this holiday season.  How silly of me to forget that!

Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

81 Responses

  1. Alexander Lee

    if I had to guess, i’d say its because google is relatively fond of the developer community, and with samsung lagging so ridiculously far behind in releasing updates (considering the flagship devices on all 4 major US carriers is a galaxy S device), they felt they had to do something to level the field with HTC devices.

    Reply
  2. mghtyred

    Simon my friend, nice OpEd piece. I’d have to agree. After seeing the specs, I am really wondering why they turned away the Vision (now known as the G2) for this.

    Reply
  3. SoffMouf

    I just can’t bring myself to get excited about this phone, and I’ve really tried. I’ll be hanging onto my Nexus One for awhile longer it seems (which is fine, as I’m still in love with it). I’m happy to see others feel the same way, since I was beginning to question my own judgement.

    Reply
  4. Jim

    I hear ya! Unfortunately the phone is not worth the paper the plans for it were written on.

    Reply
  5. Bluegizmo1983

    I would not get one. There is NOTHING special about this phone. Its, as you said, mediocre. The best phone out there in my opinion is the G2. I mean come on, show me another device that can be overclocked to 1.9Ghz! It holds all the top benchmarks on Linpack and Quadrant. And its as close to Stock Android as you can get besides the N1 or flashing a custon rom.

    Reply
    • s15274n

      Mediocre… are you serious man? Come on… there are no dual-cores out yet and that NS will be just as fast as any G2.

      Reply
      • Bluegizmo1983

        Only time will tell I suppose. It’s still a mediocre device though. No SD Card? No LED notification? No Trackball/Trackpad? No 720p recording? No video output? It’s basically a Galaxy S with a bunch of features removed. I would expect a device missing so many standard features to be released with a $300 to $400 (unsubsidized) price tag at best.

  6. Kevin Michael Lind

    get a vibrant and hack it when 2.3 gets ported… not much of a difference.. i was extremely disappointed. i was waiting for this device to replace my old friend the g1 but now i have to buy a used newish phone to keep my contract extension until next year because my g1 only gets 3-5hours of battery life when it used to be getting 12-14. its dieing..

    Reply
  7. Kevin Michael Lind

    get a vibrant and hack it when 2.3 gets ported… not much of a difference.. i was extremely disappointed. i was waiting for this device to replace my old friend the g1 but now i have to buy a used newish phone to keep my contract extension until next year because my g1 only gets 3-5hours of battery life when it used to be getting 12-14. its dieing..

    Reply
  8. Michael Silver

    Ditto. As far as I can tell it doesn’t even record HD video. I’m sure it’s a great phone, but stacked up against a Nexus One, the Nexus One probably wins.

    Reply
  9. Michael Silver

    Ditto. As far as I can tell it doesn’t even record HD video. I’m sure it’s a great phone, but stacked up against a Nexus One, the Nexus One probably wins.

    Reply
  10. Drepope100

    Honestly, I can’t justify purchasing this device myself. I purchased the Nexus One the day it came out and still own it along with several others including the Samsung Vibrant. In my opinion, this seems like a step backward. Besides flash for the rear camera, the Nexus S is the Vibrant but like most Android enthusiast, I’ll buy it because its a new Android device.

    Reply
  11. Stormy Beach

    I pretty much have to agree. Nothing that really excites me here unfortunately. I was at one point looking forward to it. Now I think I will hold off. after all it’s just a “dumbed” down version of my Vibrant with a NFC chip and curved screen. I am happy.

    Reply
  12. Jeff

    I have a Nexus One, Vibrant and a MT4G and this phone is not an upgrade from any of them in my eyes. I’m already bored with the front facing camera on the MT4G and the only other thing the Nexus S has is the Near Field Communications in it that might be nice to have but not worth going out and spending even $200 for on a new phone. I really like my Vibrant as a phone (Cheap plastic aside) but Google should have went with HTC again and really made this phone a lot more the way it should have been. Samsung once again for the EPIC FAIL.

    Reply
  13. Andrewincali

    I bought my N1 on release day last January and have yet to see any phone that tempts me to change. The only shortcoming the N1 has is internal storage… even with SD installs I run low of storage mem frequently.

    Nexus S – no SD card, no LED notification, no track ball/optical pad, plastic case

    It also doesn’t record HD… should be standard feature…. how about HDMI out? This is the new reference phone?

    Glad I have one more year on my contract, I’ll just wait for the Nexus M.

    Reply
  14. Daveloft

    Quit your crying it’s just another stock android device, your reading too much into it.

    Reply
    • Simon N. Walker

      Who’s crying. I guess you just don’t get it. Google has a reputation to live up to. They are supposed to be the ones to re-invent the wheel so to speak Set the bar for other devices to follow, just like they did with the Google Nexus One. They just burst the that bubble and are launching a device that is just like any other device on the market today. No crying, just facts and disappointment.

      Reply
      • Marcos Moncivais

        OP is right. they released the N1 and it was and still is one of the best phones out there. no doubt in my mind. this phone? no. shame that it has nexus in its name. its gonna be blown out the water in a matter of months by dual core phones.

      • Bill Surowiecki

        Im going to go ahead and point out that this is merely your opinion and nothing more. No offence intended.

        They do NOT need to reinvent the wheel. They did when Android was in its infancy and no phone on the market could live up to the OS. This is not the case anymore, they have more then enough momentum and more then enough manufacturers all jockeying for consumer cash. This means that they can now focus on the OS itself, which is more important btw, and let the other manufacturers worry about putting out the next biggest gun.

      • Hassan2ray

        they need people like you thinking backward,what other android phone you know that set the bar like the two previous G1/N1,don’t this new NS features remind you of galaxy s or the original iphone? i got the g2 but hate it because it looks like the Z.

  15. Cbursiek

    Samsucks, come on, the N1 is a still a superior handset…..I still deciding if I like all the green in 2.3.

    Reply
  16. Daveloft

    The nexus one came out under a year ago, to expect the nexus s to blow it away is rediculous.

    It does has a better cpu, gpu, display, camera and storage space. So it does have some improvements.

    If it’s not enough (if you bought your device in 2010 it really shouldn’t be. Wait till next year when a dual core phone with a 720p display will be available for a reasonable price. If your looking for that today expect to pay $800 full price and $400 on contract. That’s not a price that would sell.

    Reply
    • Hammeedo

      The Nexus One was released about 3 weeks less than a year of when this phone will be released. I want you to compare the IPhone 4 to the IPhone 3GS and tell me that there isn’t a big difference between the phones. If you expect me to fork over money to “upgrade” (more like lateral) my phone you better make it a home run. No trackball notification, only somewhat better 1GHZ processor, only 5MP camera, no MicroSD slot, and no aluminum casing. If I didn’t have a phone and wanted one, I would buy it, but I wouldn’t “upgrade” my N1 to this. I would also consider the MT4G, only reason I would lean towards this before the MT4G is to get the vanilla Android and updates first, otherwise I like HTC design and build more. Plus MT4G already has Cyanogenmod builds 😉

      Reply
      • Bill Surowiecki

        The CPU improvements are not near as important as the GPU improvements. Im sorry to say it to all you N1 fans out there, but your phones GPU BLOWS in comparison. Btw A8 in most tests beats out the iPhone 4, but just a little but it still beats it. It could be argued that the slightly higher res of the iPhone makes for the difference. The N1 on the other hand gets trounced.
        http://www.glbenchmark.com/compare.jsp?benchmark=glpro11&showhide=true&certified_only=1&D1=Samsung%20i9000%20Galaxy%20S&D2=Apple%20iPhone%204&D3=Google%20Nexus%20One&D4=T-Mobile%20G2

        Since GPU performance will be playing a major role in the coming updates to Android I would say you are in a dream world if you think that your N1 will keep up. Sure you will get the update, but at some point in 2011 you are going to feel similar to me and my G1 towards the end of its life cycle. There are already a handful of games that my buddy can not get a steady framerate on with his N1. We tested it on a standard ASOP root rom, a Cyanogen nightly and a Cyanogen stable, no change in this issue. This divide will continue to grow in the next few months as Gaming becomes a focus of the Android world.

        Also for all these dual core enthusiats. I want you to take a look back at when dual core cpus were introduced into the PC market place. How long was it before programs actually began to take real advantage dual CPUs, hell most apps still do not take advantage of more then two cores to this date. Now the mobile app world will be a little quicker to respond to this technology, but its not going to be th overnight change that most of you seem to expect. At the most the biggest differnce will be in benchmark (means nothing really) and an improvement in speed on the OS, which will not be as big as you would suspect. The other advantage is that this speed jump will be attained while keep the battery performance just about the same as todays top tiered phones.

        This phone is perfectly fine, its not a major leap, but it really didnt need to be either. The N1 for all practical purposes was a sales failure. Thats not to discredit the phone in any way, but facts are facts.
        Google has realized over the last year that they do not need to take the Apple approach to win this war. You should really just count your blessings that Google realizes that there is a devoted user base that would rather deal directly with them, instead of through the carriers and provided you with a suitable update.

      • Hammeedo

        I appreciate the reply, first real comment on how this is a better phone and what to expect over the next year. I’m not a gamer on my current phone, my 3 year old plays memory games on the phone probably more than I play angry birds on it.

        I would be happy with my N1 with a front facing camera, longer battery life, and brighter screen (Did I just describe the NS :s). I miss being able to go 2 days without worrying about the battery on my phone. I’m lucky if I make it home without my phone dying nowadays.

        The N1 was a sales failure, and it looks like Google has learned from the experiment. Customers want to play with the phone before purchasing it. Its what kept me from buying the phone in the first month, I had to wait for my friends to comment on it before I considered it.

        I am very curious what other manufacturers will release in the 1st and 2nd quarter. I’m also curious to see if Meego fails if maybe, just maybe Nokia will join the Android world. My perfect phone would be Nokia engineering running Android, Some dreams do come true, even if they require Nokia to pee their pants :s

      • Hammeedo

        I appreciate the reply, first real comment on how this is a better phone and what to expect over the next year. I’m not a gamer on my current phone, my 3 year old plays memory games on the phone probably more than I play angry birds on it.

        I would be happy with my N1 with a front facing camera, longer battery life, and brighter screen (Did I just describe the NS :s). I miss being able to go 2 days without worrying about the battery on my phone. I’m lucky if I make it home without my phone dying nowadays.

        The N1 was a sales failure, and it looks like Google has learned from the experiment. Customers want to play with the phone before purchasing it. Its what kept me from buying the phone in the first month, I had to wait for my friends to comment on it before I considered it.

        I am very curious what other manufacturers will release in the 1st and 2nd quarter. I’m also curious to see if Meego fails if maybe, just maybe Nokia will join the Android world. My perfect phone would be Nokia engineering running Android, Some dreams do come true, even if they require Nokia to pee their pants :s

  17. Rainbowpedobear

    the samsung moment would’ve made a waaaaay better successor than this lame ass excuse for a phone

    Reply
  18. steve

    You know I agree 100%, this phone is nothing other than a standard galaxy s phone with a front facing camera, curved glass and NFC… But one thing this phone will get that none of the other Samsung products will ever see is an update. That alone is the only reason to buy this phone, just to make history… just as simple proof that Samsung phones CAN receive updates… On the other hand I wonder if it’ll be running RFS… If not I’d love to see how this phone will do on quadrant unrooted, something I think all galaxy s owners have been waiting for. I’d love to see the hardware at it’s full potential.

    …Still not worth upgrading to from my fascinate though

    Reply
  19. s15274n

    To be FAIR, Forums/Blogs/Etc are the ones who Hyped this phone… on an on with rumors. I actually think it’s a very sexy phone and that will be very well received by mainstream. Would it have weathered the storm better with lcd notifications and an sd card slot, sure…. will it prevent people from buying it when they see it in the store and it has 16GB internal… maybe some, but not the majority.

    I feel this is just the next step in the Nexus line, and it IS a step up. I also have a N1 by the way (and a Vibrant).

    Reply
  20. Mabg36

    Im on at&t so when i see this phone, I think of the samsung captivate, the captivate lacks a few things the nexus s has but it has things I was expecting the nexus s to have hardware wise. The only real achilles heel I see with the nexus s is that annoying lack of an sd card slot. Everything else, though underwhelming is acceptable to me, but the lack of an sd card slot is what bitgers ne about it.

    Reply
  21. Hassan2ray

    Simon you are a genius one man brain/wikiFACT.i guess (N.f.C) never forget considering an android roots the fans.average has more than one device keep on buying them from g1,n1,and g2…a phone without all these points you high lighted i’m speachless bro…i love this site.like a dude said buying a car with no gas tank,lol.keep lifting their skirts up.

    Reply
  22. Ggfb20

    why would they call this a flagship device? htc better step up to the plate. we need dual core 1.2+ghz processor, led flash, 8mp cam, 1.3mp+ffc, 8gb+ internal storage, 32+gb micro sd slot, complete stock just like n1, wifi calling, nfc chip, ability to record calls (both ends), hd recording, hdmi out, dnla, one version with keyboard one without, build to order…, wfi b g n, bluetooth 2.1+, ability to get netflix app, am I missing anything? oh and I wouldn’t mind paying 629-700 usd for it…that would be a true flagship device, w/gingerbread +!

    Reply
  23. Super

    +1
    Mediocre is the right word.
    Pretty yes, but not a reference phone by any standard.

    It should be renamed: Galaxy S2

    Reply
      • SladeNoctis

        Its not suppose to be a sequel its not called nexus 2, its just a gingerbread flagship device which won’t last long since honeycomb is around the corner. Remember google does a serious game changer with a serious os upgrade.

  24. j-phat

    i love google but this is a huge failure imho. flagships should be groundbreaking. i hoped for waaay better specs. was there a need to rush this out the door without dual core? …or at least 1.5+ghz? not even FM? throwing ideas out there: dual core with gpu, 8+mp back camera, 4.3″ super amoled, HD FM radio, optical track pad à la htc desire, google voice with mms, video, 3g/4g calling

    Reply
  25. j-phat

    i love google but this is a huge failure imho. flagships should be groundbreaking. i hoped for waaay better specs. was there a need to rush this out the door without dual core? …or at least 1.5+ghz? not even FM? throwing ideas out there: dual core with gpu, 8+mp back camera, 4.3″ super amoled, HD FM radio, optical track pad à la htc desire, google voice with mms, video, 3g/4g calling

    Reply
  26. Michael Rosenfield

    The reason google released it was to have a testing platform to test android and for developers to test their software. It was really not meant for consumers.

    Reply
    • Simon N. Walker

      I would agree with that statement if we were still talking about the Google Nexus One, but as they have announced that the Nexus S will be available through the carriers, in the stores, I think this one is even MORE geared to the consumer than the Nexus One. Time will tell.

      Reply
      • orama

        so dessapointed!!!
        The only good thing about this pice of shiny crap is that gingerbread sttafing. in fact is more like a toy for developers than a cell for regular custumers.
        so , i would recommend safe you money and wait for the first quarterof 2011 for the real smartphones that comming up, running 1.3gigahertz or more,whit dual core,hdmi recordinng 1020 full hd whith gingerbrad preinstalled and SD card too. untill this hapens im sticking with my N1 unloked waiting the gingerbread OTA

  27. Michael Rosenfield

    The reason google released it was to have a testing platform to test android and for developers to test their software. It was really not meant for consumers.

    Reply
  28. Meade Kincke

    Totally with you babe. I was actually somewhat……”worried,” for absence of a perfect word, that this device would make me want something other than my nexus. As the kids would say, FAIL. Damn y’all. This weak ass crap is what you follow up the nexus one with? Really? No phone has progressed at all since the nexus one. Yeah, some have a second camera. Big fucking deal. The nexus one is slick as shit and STILL the best phone available. On a better note, google spared me drooling over their next phone and allowed me to spend money elsewhere. 😀

    Reply
  29. jxk

    Simon, were you drunk when you wrote that? Sounds to me like an intoxicated rant I would likely go into. 🙂

    I’m really happy Google chose a device like this for their next Nexus. They’re not concerned with OEM allegiance (HTC N1, Sam N-S, Moto N-tab), but simply embracing the best device for their software. When the N1 came out, most android devices where unable to fully utilize the latest features, so they partnered with HTC to put out a device that could. They weren’t trying to dominate the phone industry– just support their software. Most devices that have come out in 2010 have done little to push things forward, save for a few gimmicks (FFC– I’m looking at you).

    Samsung put out their Galaxy S phones and I would have to say they’re overall the best devices out (Consumer Reports agrees). Google is trying to make Android a respectable gaming platform with the improvements in 2.3, and Samsung does multimedia/gaming better than anyone. They have the SAMOLED technology which allows for thinner-than-paper screens that don’t need to stay flat. They don’t bother with unnecessary trackballs. Their audio technology is better. The NFC chip is a logical step in cellular evolution. Basically, they have exactly what Google was looking for.

    I agree with the complaints about expandable memory and the lack of HSPA+, but I do think they made the right choice overall regarding a manufacturer. And although I haven’t had any one-on-one time with a Nexus S, I think it would be a good sign that the Galaxy S series is likely to have stock Gingerbread/CM7 ported over fairly easily.

    Reply
  30. mrjoeyloke

    can anybody inform me if the vibrant has a permanent recovery image yet?! if not, and the nexus s is sporting the same internals as the vibrant, needing to odin backup all the time is goin to be a pain!
    NEXUS S FAIL!

    Reply
    • Bill Surowiecki

      There no current need to ODIN back every time you flash. If there are major changes in a rom, generally dealing with its file system, then you need to ODIN just to make sure all the crap from your previous rom is gone. In some cases you do not need to even when its a big switch, this is just a precaution.
      If you are flashing between two rather standard 2.2 roms there is no need to ODIN just flash as normal.

      Reply
  31. androidEyez

    Gotta admit this was not what I thought it would be I have the Nexus 1 and the G2 I feel that either one with a 4″ super amoled screen would look allot nicer then this nexus s but I can only comment a little now because seeing is believing so I will let this new nexus have a shot to empress me at the store if I like it then I will shell out the $ but only then will I make that choice and by the way the galaxy s2 is 100x better then nexus s.

    Reply
  32. SiRMez

    Hmm, thinking about the nexus s, I think #google doesnt want to make a big move yet. Maybe waiting till next year to revolutionize the game even more. Remember #google competes with cr*pple so maybe they are throwing a curve ball out there. Maybe #Google wants apple to think it can surpassed the nexus s and then bam, google one-ups cr*pple with a better device.

    Reply
  33. SiRMez

    Hmm, thinking about the nexus s, I think #google doesnt want to make a big move yet. Maybe waiting till next year to revolutionize the game even more. Remember #google competes with cr*pple so maybe they are throwing a curve ball out there. Maybe #Google wants apple to think it can surpassed the nexus s and then bam, google one-ups cr*pple with a better device.

    Reply
    • Ryan

      Biggest disappointment for me for sure. Considering that it is built from the similar Galaxy S line, this isn’t surprising though. HSPA+ would require a new radio and probably some more significant redesign.

      Reply
  34. mistis

    nexus one was a device for android geeks and developers. nexus s is a flagship device of PRETTY android for average cool kids. android wins with ios in terms of the OS itself, but well, still the OS is not the only thing why people choose their phones. and most of them just grab the pretty one.

    Reply
  35. ERIC

    OH MY GOD WILL YOU PEOPLE STOP YOUYR DAMN CRYING…IT DOESNT SAY NEXUS TWO…IT SAYS NEXUS S…AND HOW BOUT YOU GUYS DO THE MATH, THE GALAXY S KILLS THE NEXUS ONE AND SAMSUNG MANUFACTURED THAT, WHICH MEANS THEY MADE A BETTER PHONE THAN GOOGLE DID. SO BY MAYBE COMBINING THE TWO THIS WOULD BE A SUPER PHONE.

    IT HASNT EVEN BEEN RELEASED YET AND NO ONE EVEN KNOWS WHATS IN IT FOR SURE ITS JUST A LOT OF SPECULATION DUE TO THE FACT IT RESEMBLES A VIBRANT. WHEN ITS RELEASED IN STORES, IS WHEN YOU SHOULD JUDGE.

    Reply
    • Guest

      How about you shut up, the point that he is trying to make is that their is no wow factor and that it does even seem like the next gen nexus since the old one can still keep up just fine.

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      I think your caps lock is on. FYI the Nexus one was made by HTC. He’s just saying that when the N1 came out it was top of the line break neck spanking new hardware. This is just another Galaxy S phone with a new currently useless chip with no memory expansion and no very useful trackpad/trackball. Just some more of the same and nothing uber exciting. It’s like when a new Xbox comes out, it has a thinner shell and bigger hard drive but doesn’t make you wanna replace your current one cause it’s really the same with little to no change.

      Reply
  36. Azon21

    Maybe the thought here is that of two fold. One Honeycomb is still a bit from release and a phone that will truly support those advanced features to come is still in development, i.e. LG Tegra 2 phones etc. Two, since the name of the phone is Nexus S and not Nexus 2 I would almost venture to guess this is much like comparing iPhone 3G to 3GS in that upgrades in the OS required a dev device that could support these features especially NFC and trying to build a piece of hardware from ground level up is nearly impossible to complete at the same rate versions of the OS are released. Google needed a solid and proven hardware platform and the mere engineering hurdles are why it lacks all that is wanted by the community. I would look to see some major advancements, a Nexus 2 perhaps 1st or 2nd quarter next year when Honeycomb is released. Most manufacturers spend an entire year engineering a device, OS development for Android is 3-6 months between versions.

    Reply
  37. Mathieu

    I agree with what you say in this article as an Android fanboy and a geek.
    But, I think this Nexus S is sexy and it will do very well in stores.

    Reply
  38. Carlos Cfg Limardo

    Honestly was ready to get this ASAP. Looks like I’m just going to be spending that money to fix my cracked Nexus One screen and get that car dock I was holding out on. Trusty Nexus for another year, I’m not really too mad.

    Only thing missing is the forward facing camera, I’ll live.

    Reply
  39. Bill Surowiecki

    This is a repost based on my comments, I wanted to put them into one coherent post.

    I know a lot of you feel as though Google is supposed to reinvent the wheel with every release of a new phone.Im going to go ahead and point out that this is merely your opinion and nothing more. No offence intended.

    They do NOT need to reinvent the wheel. They did when Android was in its infancy and no phone on the market could live up to the OS. This is not the case anymore, they have more then enough momentum and more then enough manufacturers all jockeying for consumer cash. This means that they can now focus on the OS itself, which is more important btw, and let the other manufacturers worry about putting out the next biggest gun.

    Most of you seem disapointed by the fact that the CPU is basically the same. It seems that all you are looking at is the Ghz number and nothing more, this is as bad as the old “i need more G.B.’s” joke for Apple users. I know that the author of this post did not imply this and it is not directed at him as much as it is some of the commenters.
    The CPU’s improvements while existent, are not near as important as the GPU improvements. Im sorry to say it to all you N1 fans out there, but your phones GPU BLOWS in comparison. Btw A8 in most tests beats out the iPhone 4, but just a little but it still beats it. It could be argued that the slightly higher res of the iPhone makes for the difference. The N1 on the other hand gets trounced.
    http://www.glbenchmark.com/compare.jsp?benchmark=glpro11&showhide=true&certified_only=1&D1=Samsung%20i9000%20Galaxy%20S&D2=Apple%20iPhone%204&D3=Google%20Nexus%20One&D4=T-Mobile%20G2

    Since GPU performance will be playing a major role in the coming updates to Android I would say you are in a dream world if you think that your N1 will keep up. Sure you will get the update, but at some point in 2011 you are going to feel similar to me and my G1 towards the end of its life cycle. There are already a handful of games that my buddy can not get a steady framerate on with his N1. We tested it on a standard ASOP root rom, a Cyanogen nightly and a Cyanogen stable, no change in this issue. This divide will continue to grow in the next few months as Gaming becomes a focus of the Android world.

    Also for all these dual core enthusiats. I want you to take a look back at when dual core cpus were introduced into the PC market place. How long was it before programs actually began to take real advantage dual core CPUs, hell most apps still do not take advantage of more then two cores to this date. Now the mobile app world will be a little quicker to respond to this technology, but its not going to be the overnight change that most of you seem to expect. At the most the biggest differnce will be in benchmark (means nothing really) scores and an improvement in speed on the OS, which will not be as big as you would suspect. The other advantage is that this speed jump will be attained while keep the battery performance just about the same as todays top tiered phones.

    This phone is perfectly fine, its not a major leap, but it really didnt need to be either. The N1 for all practical purposes was a sales failure. Thats not to discredit the phone in any way, but facts are facts.
    Google has realized over the last year that they do not need to take the Apple approach to win this war. You should really just count your blessings that Google realizes that there is a devoted user base that would rather deal directly with them, instead of through the carriers and provided you with a suitable update.

    Reply
  40. brian pyeatt

    personaly, i think its great that the ” latest greatest” is based on the vibrant… no wonder adding a ffc to the vib was so easy, samsung had it pland alll along….

    WILL I BUY THE NEXUS S? no…. ill spend the $30 to buy a ffc for my vib, and wait a few days for gingerbread to be ported to the vib… .

    now , what will be realy cool is , i bet we get oficial 2.3 on the vib before we get oficial 2.2… lol…

    Reply
    • Bill Surowiecki

      You should know that there are still issues with the FFC mod on the Vibrant. There are some horrible banding issues in mid to low light levels. It remains to be seen if this issue can be fixed. Eugene seems to feel that this is hardware based on the power provided at the pin level of the connector for the camera.

      BTW I have the FFC installed in my Vibrant and these issues are real.

      Reply
  41. theShiz

    The problem is the design shape. Samsung may have that whole screen thing going, but they lack innovative outward appearance design. Some of their phones even look like the old iPhone design. The reason HTC is the better choice is because they have design sexyness. Look at the Desire and Desire HD. They are sexy and functional. This design I’d expect more for Microsoft. They often design with thought to sexy functionality. They should have let HTC design the phone. This looks cheap and boring. I have no “Desire” to buy this when almost any hi end 2.3 Gbreads HTC coming out this and next yr are surely going to blow this out of the water. Let’s face it, if it wasn’t for HTC, there would be no reason for Apple to be all flustered and sue happy. This phone won’t do nearly as well unless HTC falls off the planet.

    Reply
  42. Daneelgiskaard

    N1 is a buggy device, it had a below par touchscreen which goes haywire, bad radio reception, battery hog especially on 3g (which does not last 16hours with low use), bad customer support. I would gladly get nexus S, and the only thing I would miss would be multi color trackball notifications not even the trackball itself. I dont care about gaming gpu performance one bit, I think the cpu is adequately powerful and they should focus on lower power usage.

    I am ok with plastic I am ok with ugly, its not a fashion statement and this is a comm/consumption device. Make battery last, screen readable, good radio performance, iphone like touchscreen accuracy, that is what matters

    Typed from my N1

    Reply
  43. John

    i think the no sd card is just a typo on google/phone it shows no sd card but on google/nexus it says flashable drive… my guess is they havent picked the size of the sd yet :/

    Reply
    • Nate

      There have been hands-on reviews written about the Nexus S and they physically saw no SD slot – could it be that the models were ‘dummy’ models and didn’t have it put in yet? That would be such a catastrophically awful decision, in my opinion, if they did not include expandable memory.

      Reply
  44. John

    i think the no sd card is just a typo on google/phone it shows no sd card but on google/nexus it says flashable drive… my guess is they havent picked the size of the sd yet :/

    Reply
  45. Davidcheng11

    this is great haha. this is no doubt the longest androidspin comment thread i’ve ever seen, and for good reason. i thought i was the only one who thought the nexus s wasn’t worth the hype at all, but now i see i’m in good company.

    basically, my opinions have already been expressed. the “nexus” name has become one that coincides with top of the line, new, innovative technology. the nexus one was one of the first devices to sport a 1ghz processor, 512 mb ram, etc. packed into an incredibly sturdy htc build. it may not have sold well, but check it out anywhere–ebay, amazon, craigslist, etc., and the n1 still runs $350+ after almost a full year. plus, the n1’s specs are basically the same as every phone released this year (no ffc, slightly worse cpu/gpu).

    that said, i know the n1 will become old and weak. my main issue is that google decided to work with samsung on this (i’ll admit i’m an htc fanboy; their builds are just so sturdy and sleek), especially with the weak specs. the specs aren’t bad, just not groundbreaking, and for it to be this year’s “google phone,” i just don’t feel it serves google/android justice like the nexus one did.

    Reply
  46. JasonX

    Below expectations.

    Sure, its somewhat faster than and graphics is better than the Nexus1… but thats just about it.
    There is nothing new to the table.

    i admit, i’ve never used the trackball/point much at all. So its not a loss to me.
    SD Card…. unless someone is planning an upgrade to 32Gb. Else it won’t even matter at all will it?

    missing LED notification will be annoying… no convenient way of checking if i missed anything. okok.. i have to install an app to get it on screen. it works.. but still a tad annoying.

    no radio.. a bit sad but not critical.

    the most annoying is… there is nothing to scream about!
    nfc is nothing to scream about. its only read. interesting. still only a reader. nothing special.

    its for game developers to develop games based on A8 processor and graphics.
    but this is so… thisss generation…

    err.. end of story. anti-climatic.

    Reply
  47. Julius

    This is all strictly in my humble opinion based on the fact that I’m a T-Mobile customer, and own a Vibrant. That said, like others here I acknowledge the [subtle(?)] differences between the Galaxy S devices and the Nexus S so I’m onboard with:
    •NFC
    •FFC
    •Camera Flash
    •Support for T-Mobile’s network (for those who care, like me)
    •Curved Display
    •The “pure Google experience” and everything that entails

    But I don’t feel *all* of its new features should/can be considered ‘pros’ because they’re not features I’m longing for or really desire at the moment:
    1.NFC: Few places in my area support this so I don’t see how I’m going to make much use of this initially
    2.Curved Display: I hardly consider this a feature; I don’t see/understand how I’m going to benefit. Its not like I’m getting cramps holding my phone.

    And as others have voiced, I share the same sentiments that in some ways the Nexus S is a step backwards:
    •Lacks a microSD slot
    •Defaults to 480 recording
    •No HSPA+ (for those it matters to, like me)
    •Bluetooth downgraded from 3.0 to 2.3 with EDR+

    Unfortunately for me, some of these missing feaures are a big deal:
    1.The lack of a microSD slot is nearly a deal breaker.
    2.If the recording video quality is software controlled, why is it nerfed out of the box? Lame. Now we have to rely on some group of devs to figure this out, or wait for Google to release an update to address this issue, if they even consider it an issue.
    3.The lack of HSPA+ is just a disappointment, but at least its a lateral move so I’m not losing functionality. To quote another “below expectations”.
    4.I don’t use BT so much these days so I’m not really missing anything, but why not 3.0?

    I was hoping for an ‘immediate future proof’ device; not 6 months down the road future, but like 3 months ago till maybe Q2 of 2011? Honestly, I’ll have to handle the device to be swayed in either direction. If the lack of Sammy’s [poorly] implemented RFS produces a lag-free experience in general, and there aren’t any GPS issues, or really any annoying issues in general, that just might be enough for me to jump, but its a tough call right now.

    Sources:
    http://www.google.com/phone/compare/?phone=nexus-s&phone=t-mobile-mytouch-4g&phone=samsung-vibrant-a-galaxy-s-phone
    http://www.google.com/phone/detail/nexus-s
    http://www.google.com/nexus/tech-specs.html#!/tech-specs
    Multiple: http://www.pcworld.com/search?qt=Nexus+s&s=d
    Among Others: http://tinyurl.com/2vbnbtx

    Reply
  48. Julius

    This is all strictly in my humble opinion based on the fact that I’m a T-Mobile customer, and own a Vibrant. That said, like others here I acknowledge the [subtle(?)] differences between the Galaxy S devices and the Nexus S so I’m onboard with:
    •NFC
    •FFC
    •Camera Flash
    •Support for T-Mobile’s network (for those who care, like me)
    •Curved Display
    •The “pure Google experience” and everything that entails

    But I don’t feel *all* of its new features should/can be considered ‘pros’ because they’re not features I’m longing for or really desire at the moment:
    1.NFC: Few places in my area support this so I don’t see how I’m going to make much use of this initially
    2.Curved Display: I hardly consider this a feature; I don’t see/understand how I’m going to benefit. Its not like I’m getting cramps holding my phone.

    And as others have voiced, I share the same sentiments that in some ways the Nexus S is a step backwards:
    •Lacks a microSD slot
    •Defaults to 480 recording
    •No HSPA+ (for those it matters to, like me)
    •Bluetooth downgraded from 3.0 to 2.3 with EDR+

    Unfortunately for me, some of these missing feaures are a big deal:
    1.The lack of a microSD slot is nearly a deal breaker.
    2.If the recording video quality is software controlled, why is it nerfed out of the box? Lame. Now we have to rely on some group of devs to figure this out, or wait for Google to release an update to address this issue, if they even consider it an issue.
    3.The lack of HSPA+ is just a disappointment, but at least its a lateral move so I’m not losing functionality. To quote another “below expectations”.
    4.I don’t use BT so much these days so I’m not really missing anything, but why not 3.0?

    I was hoping for an ‘immediate future proof’ device; not 6 months down the road future, but like 3 months ago till maybe Q2 of 2011? Honestly, I’ll have to handle the device to be swayed in either direction. If the lack of Sammy’s [poorly] implemented RFS produces a lag-free experience in general, and there aren’t any GPS issues, or really any annoying issues in general, that just might be enough for me to jump, but its a tough call right now.
    I don’t expect Google to re-invent the wheel or come out with some revolutionary mystery phone. But I expect that they would, at a minimum, keep in pace with current ‘standards’ (so called) and plan for or leave room for upcoming/future trends.

    Sources:
    http://www.google.com/phone/compare/?phone=nexus-s&phone=t-mobile-mytouch-4g&phone=samsung-vibrant-a-galaxy-s-phone
    http://www.google.com/phone/detail/nexus-s
    http://www.google.com/nexus/tech-specs.html#!/tech-specs
    Multiple: http://www.pcworld.com/search?qt=Nexus+s&s=d
    Among Others: http://tinyurl.com/2vbnbtx

    Reply

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